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16 Year Veteran Seattle Cop Pleads Guilty To Smuggling Large Quantities Of Weed Cross Country

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UK paedophile grooming gang member handed additional jail time for trolling victims online

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UK paedophile grooming gang member handed additional jail time

A paedophile jailed for 10 years for abusing young girls in the UK town of Rotherham has had 45 months added to his jail term after being found guilty of using social media to target his victims online.

As well as using Facebook and Twitter profiles to troll the young girls he attacked, 35-year-old Waseem Khaliq also used a mobile phone that had been smuggled into his jail to make phone calls to police, during which he made threats towards two officers who investigated the child abuse allegations of which he was convicted.

Khaliq used the smuggled phone to contact the National Crime Agency (NCA) control centre, telling operators that he knew where one of the investigating officers lived, that he was close to discovering the address of the other, and that he hoped they both died of either cancer or Aids.

The child abuser was handed his 10-year jail last month alongside five other men after being convicted of indecent assault and child abduction as part of Operation Stovewood, the NCA’s investigation into historical allegations of abuse and exploitation in Rotherham.

Members of the paedophile grooming gang were said by prosecutors to sit in their cars outside girls’ schools, before plying their underage victims with drugs and alcohol and subjecting them to sexual assaults.

At Sheffield Crown Court, Khaliq was sentenced to an additional 45 months to run consecutively to his initial term after he pleaded guilty to three counts of witness intimidation.

He admitted to setting up a Facebook profile under the false name of Andros Simpson after he was charged, which he used to pose as an investigative journalist looking into child sex grooming gangs operating in Rotherham.

Commenting on the extra jail time handed to Khaliq, NCA Senior Investigating Officer Phillip Marshall said: “Through his vindictive campaign of social media trolling Khaliq only compounded the suffering his victims had already gone through.

“They showed extreme bravery in coming forward and continuing to give evidence despite this, and I once again pay tribute to them.

“Our investigation has been victim focused throughout, and this conviction demonstrates that we will not tolerate attempts to intimidate victims or our officers who work with them.”

Operation Stovewood is described by the NCA as the largest ever investigation into non-recent child sexual exploitation undertaken by law enforcement authorities in the UK.

The probe was launched after allegations emerged that hundreds of young girls had been targeted by grooming gangs in the town for decades.

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Farmer jailed for smuggling illicit garlic shipments into Australia

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smuggling illicit garlic shipments into Australia

A farmer has been jailed for risking the biosecurity of Australia by smuggling garlic into the country from locations including the US, Canada and France.

Letetia Anne Ware, 53, was handed an 11-month prison term after being convicted of illegally importing more than 2,000 garlic bulbs into the country in contravention of Australia’s strict biosecurity rules.

The importation of garlic into Australia is tightly regulated owing to the fact that some varieties of the plant can carry the Xylella fastidiosa bacteria, which is considered to be one of the gravest threats to flora biodiversity in the country.

In order to be brought into Australia legitimately, shipments of garlic must be managed by licensed importers, and accompanied with official certification that proves they are free from pests and diseases.

Ware, who stepped down from her role as the Chair of the Australian Garlic industry Association (AGIA) after pleading guilty to the crime of which she was convicted, is said to have used numerous eBay accounts to order shipments of garlic from France, South Korea, Canada and the US.

Over an 18-month period, Ware imported a total of 21 consignments of garlic, on occasion telling exporters to mislabel the contents of packages as “office supplies” to avoid the attention of customs inspectors.

Hobart Supreme Court was told that Ware was fully aware of the rules relating to the biosecurity threat posed by the garlic she smuggled into the country as she had previously held an import licence for mushrooms.

She will be eligible for parole after two months, provided she hands over a A$2,000 ($1,337) fine.

The maximum penalty for illegally importing garlic into Australia is 10 years behind bars and a fine of up to A$300,000.

In a statement, the AGIA said: “The board strongly condemns any behaviour that jeopardises biosecurity or the Australian agricultural industry

“We ask for the patience and support of all our members and urge them not to contribute or participate in the ongoing perception that the AGIA board or Association were in anyway connected, or knew of, Letetia’s illegal activities…

“We understand that many garlic growers are concerned for the safety of their own crops, and can take some level of relief that Justice Gleeson found that this imported garlic was not diseased.”

In August, an Australia court jailed two men for illegally importing pig semen from Denmark in shampoo bottles.

Director of pig farm GR Pork Torben Soerensen and the company’s breeding manager Henning Laue were jailed for a minimum of 18 months and eight months respectively at Perth District Court.

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UK millennials most likely to fall victim to banking impersonation scams, poll finds

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UK millennials most likely to fall victim to banking impersonation scams

A new survey has revealed that UK millennials are more at risk than other Britons when it comes to falling victim to banking impersonation scams.

The poll, which was conducted by Lloyds Bank, recorded a four-fold rise in the number of consumers aged between 18 and 34 who were duped over the past 12 months by such scams, during which fraudsters pretend to be workers from banks, tax authorities or police in order to con victims into handing over cash.

In the course of such scams, which can be conducted over the phone or online, fraudsters attempt to convince people to hand over their banking or personal information such as passwords or PINs, or persuade them to make a credit card payment or bank transfer to a bogus recipient account.

While younger people were found to be more likely to fall for such fraud attempts than any other age group last year, victims aged over 55 lost the most in banking impersonation scams.

People in this age group lost an average of £10,716 ($12.850) to this type of fraud over the past 12 months, which compares to £3,573 for those aged between 45 and 54, and £2,630 for millennials.

Oftentimes, people who fall victim to this type of scam in the UK are unable to get their money back on account of the fact they have willingly compromised their account security.

Many banks argue that they offer customers ample warning about the dangers of providing banking information or making a payment to these types of scammers.

Commenting on the results of the survey, Paul Davis, Retail Fraud Director at Lloyds Bank, said: “Helping to keep our customers’ money safe is our number one priority – being a victim of fraud can have devastating effects not just on people’s finances but also their lives.

“While we are working 24/7 behind the scenes to protect customers and millions of pounds have been frozen, every day fraudsters are trying to trick people into handing over their personal information like a PIN or password or transferring cash.

“Our new campaign will help people to recognise the signs by reminding them that we will never call and ask them to move money to another account. The more we all know about spotting scams, the safer we will all be.”

In May, the Daily Telegraph reported that new measures intended to prevent this type of fraud had been delayed.

Under a new system that will now not be introduced until March of next year, banks will be compelled to confirm the name on a payee account before actioning a transfer of funds.

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