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British jail inmates smoking dressing gowns soaked in synthetic cannabinoid Spice, prison chief warns

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dressing gowns soaked in synthetic cannabinoid Spice

Prisoners in UK jails are smoking dressing gowns soaked in synthetic cannabinoid Spice, the Governor of HMP Leeds has told the BBC.

Speaking with Radio 4’s Today programme on Friday, Steve Robson said visitors had been passing prisoners items of clothing impregnated with substances such as Spice, which inmates then cut up into sections to be smoked.

Robson said one dressing gown that was being passed around convicts was found to have been soaked in new psychoactive substances after it was seized by prison officers.

He added that all clothing provided by visitors is now swabbed before being handed to inmates, and that officers examine what new prisoners are wearing when they arrive at the jail.

Inmates in UK prions have for some time now been coming up with ever more ingenuous ways of getting drugs such as Spice behind bars, where they can fetch as many as ten times their street value.

British prison authorities have discovered letters and books that have been soaked in new psychoactive substances sent to inmates, and dead birds with Spice sewed into their bodies thrown over jail walls.

Demand for Spice has now become so high among inmates that a tiny square inch of paper soaked in the drug can now be sold for £100 behind bars, when a similar amount of money used to secure a whole A4 sheet impregnated with the substance.

So much money can now be made from the trade in drugs and other illicit items in British jails that organised crime gangs are thought to be encouraging their associates to secure prison service jobs in order to smuggle contraband behind bars.

Speaking separately with the BBC last week, a senior British police officer said he has “strong suspicions” that organised criminal gang members are securing jobs in UK prisons.

Assistant Chief Constable Jason Hogg said he fears gangs are persuading their associates or family members to find work in the country’s jails.

“There are some examples of staff, very soon after they work in that prison estate, whether it’s as a prison officer or a maintenance worker, if you like, they move towards supplying contraband,” he said.

Hogg spoke out as it was reported that a woman from Rotherham had been jailed for three years after she was caught smuggling drugs into HMP Doncaster.

April Paget, 31, admitted smuggling class A drugs into the jail.

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Colombian man caught with half kilo of cocaine under wig at Barcelona airport

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cocaine under wig

Police working at Barcelona’s El Prat international airport have arrested a man who was found to have half a kilo of cocaine concealed beneath an ill-fitting hairpiece.

Officers spotted the man after he arrived on a flight from the Colombian capital of Bogota.

They noticed that he was acting in a nervous manner and appeared to be sporting a disproportionately large hairpiece under a hat.

After taking him to one side for a search, investigators discovered a package of white powder that had been stuck to the man’s head underneath the outsized toupee.

The 65-year-old was arrested immediately, and was later charged after tests confirmed that the white powder was cocaine that was estimated to be worth €30,000 ($33,390).

In one photograph released by Spain’s national police force, the man can be seen from the side wearing a wig that protrudes to an unnatural height over the top of his head.

Another shot taken from the front shows the package of cocaine clearly visible beneath the hairpiece.

In a statement cited by the Reuters news agency, Spanish police said: “There is no limit to the inventiveness of drug traffickers trying to mock controls.”

Spain, which is one of the main entry points for cocaine exported into Europe from Colombia, has seen several novel large-scale smuggling attempts over the course of the past year, the majority of which appeared to have benefitted from better planning than the wig conspiracy.

Back in June, Spanish police revealed they had arrested 11 suspected traffickers after discovering a tonne of cocaine hidden inside fake stones shipped into the country from South America.

Investigators released a video that showed officers smashing open the bogus stones to discover 785 packages of cocaine, each of which was estimated to contain more than 1kg of the drug.

Just weeks earlier, police in the country announced they had smashed a South American organised trafficking network that injected large quantities of cocaine into plastic pellets before smuggling them to three specialist laboratories in Madrid and Toledo, where the drugs would be extracted by experts who had been flown in from Colombia.

Last August, Spanish investigators intercepted 67kgs of cocaine that had been concealed inside pineapple skins.

The gang behind the plot had hollowed out fresh pineapples before filling their skins with cylinders containing as much as 7kgs of cocaine each.

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Wildlife trade NGO TRAFFIC holds two-day workshop intended to improve animal crime conviction rates across India

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Wildlife trade NGO TRAFFIC holds two-day workshop

Illicit animal trade monitoring network TRAFFIC has helped organise a two-day conference in India intended to help local law enforcement officials improve wildlife crime conviction rates.

Held in cooperation with WWF-India, the Maharashtra Judiciary Academy and the Legal Initiative for Forest and Environment (Life), the event was designed to improve the knowledge of police officers responsible for wildlife crime in Maharashtra, Goa and Daman.

Dr Saket Badola, Head of TRAFFIC’s India office, said: “For any law in force, it is often not only the level of punishment but the surety of timely conviction, which act as crime deterrents.

“Proper orientation of judicial officers will ensure better implementation of wildlife, forest and environmental laws and help in controlling the crime.”

Commenting on efforts to crack down on wildlife crime in his region, Justice BP Dharmadhikari, Director of the Maharashtra Judicial Academy, said: “Over a period of time, Maharashtra has taken steps and passed several resolutions in the prevailing legal systems to protect and better manage the environment and forests.

“Most of the judges present may be dealing with such cases—therefore this orientation programme is very apt, timely and necessary.”

It was revealed earlier this month that a global crackdown on wildlife crime coordinated by Interpol and the World Customs Organisation (WCO) resulted in law enforcement officials in India making several seizures.

As part of the operation, Indian investigators discovered an infant langur that had been smuggled into the country from Bangladesh.

Elsewhere, the Indian Wildlife Crime Control Bureau seized a lesser flamingo from a pet shop, as well as live parakeets and munias during road checkpoint inspections.

The bureau was also involved in the discovery a smuggled lion cub that had been brought into the country from Bangladesh, and was scheduled for onward trafficking to the UK.

Back in February of this year, border inspectors working at India’s Chennai Airport in the state of Tamil Nadu stopped a man who was attempting to smuggle a weeks-old leopard cub into the country concealed inside his suitcase.

The man, who had arrived on a flight from Bangkok, was stopped when customs officials observed him behaving strangely while attempting to leave the terminal building, and then heard faint whimpering emanating from his luggage.

Indian and Burmese officials last year agreed at a bilateral summit to work more closely together to fight wildlife smuggling and drug trafficking on the border between the two countries.

In a statement issued last October, officials said: “It was… agreed to cooperate in preventing smuggling of wildlife and narcotic drugs and to strengthen cooperation on the international border management.”

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Police in US warn against flushing drugs down toilet through fear of creating ‘meth gators’

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US police have warned members of the public against flushing their methamphetamine stashes down the toilet in order to avoid creating what they describe as “meth gators”.

In a post that has now been taken down from its Facebook page, Loretto Police Department in Tennessee described an incident during which its officers caught a suspected drug dealer attempting to dispose of 12 grams of crystal methamphetamine and more than 700 millilitres of the liquid form of the drug by flushing it down his lavatory over the weekend.

After describing how officers charged the man with possession of drugs with intent to supply and tampering with evidence, the force cautioned against disposing of illegal drugs down toilets, noting how doing so could have an adverse effect on wildlife.

“This Folks… please don’t flush your drugs m’kay (sic). When you send something down the sewer pipe it ends up in our retention ponds for processing before it is sent down stream,” the post read.

“Now our sewer guys take great pride in releasing water that is cleaner than what is in the creek, but they are not really prepared for meth.

“Ducks, Geese, and other fowl frequent our treatment ponds and we shudder to think what one all hyped up on meth would do.

“Furthermore, if it made it far enough we could create meth gators in Shoal Creek and the Tennessee River down in North Alabama. They’ve had enough meth-ed up animals the past few weeks without our help.

“So, if you need to dispose of your drugs just give us a call and we will make sure they are disposed of in the proper way.”

While the effect drugs such as methamphetamine might have on alligators is unknown, a study published earlier this year by King’s College London revealed that every shrimp researchers tested in 15 river locations across the British county of Suffolk contained traces of cocaine.

The animals the scientists tested were also found to contain traces of other illicit drugs and potentially toxic substances, including ketamine, pesticides and pharmaceuticals.

Earlier this month, the UK’s Sun newspaper reported that a greyhound trainer was forced to give up his licence after it was discovered that he had fed cocaine to his dogs in an effort to make them run faster.

Thomas Jordan Jnr, 49, was told he had “no place in greyhound racing” after his plot to drug his dogs was uncovered.

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